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Bullyproof brings together leaders from a variety of backgrounds and industries who have a common purpose: to effect change in society by empowering children and teenagers to become ‘bullyproof’. With anti-bully programs currently boasting only limited success, our experts bring their own personal perspectives and experience on how to empower young people to unleash the heroes inside themselves. Using unique and effective methods, educators can help children and families explore real and usable strategies to prevent bullying both on themselves and others. Opening a line of communication about bully prevention and how to become ‘bullyproof’ involves training kids to change the way they think about bullies, the dangers in the world, and most importantly themselves. Bullying can be detrimental to individuals and society alike, but we can change the way we attack the problem and come up with a solution that works for children and teens of all backgrounds. 

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Bullying takes many forms. The current state of bullying permeates physically as it has for many years, but has grown a new and terrifying presence on the internet. 

According to the CDC, students who experience bullying are at increased risk for academic problems, substance abuse, and violent behavior later on in life. With the media bringing more attention to the extreme effects of bullying on kids, including beatings and suicide, it is more important now than ever that we teach our children to confront bullying head-on with the confidence and courage necessary to overcome it.  

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About Bullies Studies have shown that bullies are made by their environments rather than biology. Bullying is not a negative behavioral pattern a person is born with, therefore it is possible to control impulses to negatively exert power over others and this is best done at a very early age where the initial signs can be detected by those living in close proximity to the child. The toddler age in a child’s life is the starting point of asserting their will and if this is left uncorrected, it will eventually cause the child to evolve into a bully.  

 A good percentage of bullies eventually grow into fairly normal adults yet they are still very much capable of being overly assertive when the occasion calls for such a display. However there are the few who tend to take things too far and even as adults are unable to act and rationalize things in a civil manner thus becoming a nuisance and a threat to society at large.  

More often than not children who are the victims of bullying will almost always keep this fact to themselves for fear of repercussions if they tell on the bully. Children do not see bullying ending well for themselves in many scenarios, and fear is a driving force that can incite them to keep their pain to themselves rather than face it head on. This is not an ideal scenario as detection is difficult from uninvolved parties if there are no witnesses or victims who are willing to step up and speak of the traumatizing experiences. However, parents should take the initiative to explain to their children how destructive this behavior can be and encourage them to open up about their experience to trusted friends and advisors. This positive reinforcement is a good way to get children to come clean about their own bullying experiences, which is the first step to solving them.  

Teaching a child to resolve matters without resorting to bullying is extremely important and can actually be started from a very early age. Children should be instructed to settle disputes in respectful ways, treating each other’s feelings and personal space as utterly meaningful. Starting these lessons in a calm and gentle manner would be wise, as the child will eventually follow the parent’s lead in the way matters are handled. However there may be times where a more severe action needs to be taken in order to teach the child that the bullying tactic is unacceptable, and this should be done firmly but without unnecessary force.  

Online Resources to Help You and Your Child  

Finding bullying resources is simple today with the advent of the internet. Despite the ease of gathering statistics, it’s important to differentiate between good information and poor information. Poor information may blame victims for being bullied, have improper collection techniques, or be skewed in favor of a particular social opinion. The following sites offer accurate information that you can easily access from the comfort of your home or the classroom.  

* StopBullying.gov – This US Government site that has a wealth of information about combating bullying and educating the public about different types of bullying. It has teachable content for both the bullied and bullies about why bullying is bad and how to stop it. They are in partnership with the Department of Education and provide up-to-date information to help stop bullying.  

* NoBullying.com – This website claims to be the "World’s Authority" on bullying and they have plenty of information about how to help different groups of people who are experiencing bullying.  

* Anti-Bullying Alliance – This organization is based out of London, England. They have information that is laid out in an easily accessible way despite their transatlantic separation from US anti-bullying initiatives. They have advice for everyone, including teachers, students, parents, and others. They even have information on programs that you can start in your local school with support.  

Link - https://www.anti-bullyingalliance.org.uk/  

* ActAgainstViolence.apa.org – This organization is from Washington DC and provides handouts, tip sheets, webinars, and more, all about preventing violence and raising safe kids and creating strong families. Their goal is to stop violence in our families and in our schools.  

* American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry – This is a great place to find bullying facts and information as well as guides to help families combat bullying, whether their child is being bullied or is the bully. Often a child who has been bullied needs help building self-esteem, and finding a counselor for them can help. Likewise, if you have a child who is a bully, getting professional help for them can make all the difference.  

Link - https://www.aacap.org/aacap/Families_and_Youth/Resource_Centers/Bullying_Resource_Center/Home.aspx  

* Child Safety Network – This organization (which is part of the Education Development Center in Massachusetts) has a great bullying prevention resource guide that you can use, as well as toolkits, programs, campaigns and more. Plus, you can find even more organizations that may help you overcome a bullying situation with your child.  

Link - https://www.edc.org/sites/default/files/uploads/Bullying Prevention.pdf  

Bullying is a chronic problem in most schools and should be addressed prior to any problems being developed. Schools that start an anti-bullying program from day one are less likely to have serious bullying problems.  

  

  

  

 

Different Types of Bullying  

Bullying comes in several different forms that are externally recognizable. Often a bully will utilize more than one type of bullying to cause chaos in their victim’s life. The best way to deal with any type of bullying is directly - by ending the ability for the bully to have access to their victim, and educating people on it’s effects.  

1. Physical - This type of bullying is essentially physical abuse. It happens when the bully may punch, bite, or otherwise make physical threats against the person they are bullying to intimate them. They may also take the lunch money, toys, books, and destroy the property of their target. This type of bullying is the most immediately dangerous due to the risk of injury or in extreme cases death.  

2. Verbal – Sometimes physical bullying also has a component of verbal abuse simultaneously. This type of bullying includes persistent name calling, threats, and other verbal abuse that can negatively impact the self-esteem of the victim.  

3. Emotional – This type of bullying can be very pervasive and often happens within peer groups as well as relationships. It is often difficult to spot because ‘gaslighting’ can masquerade as compassion or even love in many cases. For example, a boyfriend or girlfriend might withhold love if the person isn’t acting how they want them to in a way that is abusive.  

4. Sexual – Any type of unwanted physical, verbal or emotional contact that is sexual in nature and repetitive is a form of sexual bullying or assault. These interactions are often shame-based in nature and can touch on sexuality or sexual orientation in ways that are defamatory to the victim.  

5. Racist – This type of bullying may be expressed through jokes, slurs, and physical intimidation using known racist symbols, terms, and gestures. A person using racist bullying may make fun of the victim’s way of dressing, praying, or living according to their culture.  

6. Social – This often happens in peer groups where a group bullies a victim into doing things they really didn’t want to do such as use drugs, perform sexual acts, or do other things - even how they dress. Social bullying can be milder forms of peer pressure or more dangerous social force interactions.  

7. Cyber – This is any type of bullying that happens through online means such as chats, social media, instant messaging, texting, recording, or doing other things to embarrass or target the victim in question. Cyber bullying has grown exponentially in recent years and is one of the largest reaching and most dangerous types of bullying because of its transient nature.  

  

  

  

 

About Bullies

Madeline Carpenter

Getting Started

Studies have shown that bullies are made by their environments rather than biology. Bullying is not a negative behavioral pattern a person is born with, therefore it is possible to control impulses to negatively exert power over others and this is best done at a very early age where the initial signs can be detected by those living in close proximity to the child. The toddler age in a child’s life is the starting point of asserting their will and if this is left uncorrected, it will eventually cause the child to evolve into a bully.  

 A good percentage of bullies eventually grow into fairly normal adults yet they are still very much capable of being overly assertive when the occasion calls for such a display. However there are the few who tend to take things too far and even as adults are unable to act and rationalize things in a civil manner thus becoming a nuisance and a threat to society at large.  

More often than not children who are the victims of bullying will almost always keep this fact to themselves for fear of repercussions if they tell on the bully. Children do not see bullying ending well for themselves in many scenarios, and fear is a driving force that can incite them to keep their pain to themselves rather than face it head on. This is not an ideal scenario as detection is difficult from uninvolved parties if there are no witnesses or victims who are willing to step up and speak of the traumatizing experiences. However, parents should take the initiative to explain to their children how destructive this behavior can be and encourage them to open up about their experience to trusted friends and advisors. This positive reinforcement is a good way to get children to come clean about their own bullying experiences, which is the first step to solving them.  

Teaching a child to resolve matters without resorting to bullying is extremely important and can actually be started from a very early age. Children should be instructed to settle disputes in respectful ways, treating each other’s feelings and personal space as utterly meaningful. Starting these lessons in a calm and gentle manner would be wise, as the child will eventually follow the parent’s lead in the way matters are handled. However there may be times where a more severe action needs to be taken in order to teach the child that the bullying tactic is unacceptable, and this should be done firmly but without unnecessary force.

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1 – Start with preparing a website strategy

Any successful small business website has one commonality: a well thought through strategy. With a plan in place, you’re teed off for success when it comes to supporting lead generation goals. Your website plan should answer the following ten questions:

  • Who is your audience?
  • What is your website’s goal or goals? (Rank and prioritize them!)
  • What functionality will your website have? (what’s critical and what’s a ‘nice to have’?)
  • What information do you need/want to give website visitors? 

2 – Set a clear page hierarchy

After you have developed the overall goals and a blueprint with tips on creating a website for your business, the next step is making it easy for website visitors to find content. To do this, make sure your page hierarchy is clear.

Social Media Today suggests bucketing your content by theme and importance. Try physically drawing a plan as you create a high-level outline. Most people freeze up at this point so it’s important to visualize your website structure!

3 – Keep it (so so) simple

Simple design and text are essential to an effective small business website. An overly complicated website doesn’t convert. Too many page elements lead to website visitor confusion.

So, long story short, uncluttered visuals and text have the most significant impact on your audience. And, while we’re on the subject of simplicity, keeping your color scheme minimal is key, too. Two to three colors is all you need to make an impact.

Be pragmatic in your color selection and fortify the use of white space within your small business website design. 

“This is not the time to show off your design acumen, with lots of distracting sounds and lights on the site and every icon known to web-kind,” says Nationwide.  

4 – Maintain well-defined calls to action

As a small business, you don’t need to be coy, Roy. Clearly state what you want people to do.

Use phrases like, “Subscribe to our newsletter,” “Book your reservation now” or “Email us for a free quote today.” After you identify your page structure, sketch out your content sections and maintain well-defined CTAs, then layer in conversion opportunities like pop-ups, alert bars, and more! Your lead forms should be prominent and enticing as well.

5 – Make your design responsive

Did you know 90% of small business websites don’t keep the smaller devices’ screen size in mind when creating websites? And around 30% of all website traffic is mobile. 

Before publishing anything on the web, always consider desktop and mobile devices. “Having a site that isn’t mobile optimized can drive away customers, hurt your SEO and look unprofessional,” notes Small Business Trends writer Ann Pilon. 

The finale: last tidbits on small business website tips

So there you have it… we hope these 5 tips for building an effective business website were consumable and prompt action as you embark on creating your small business website. 

About The Author

Madeline Carpenter is the founder of Market ‘Til You Make It. When she’s not serving her clients, she geeks out on board games, cider, and challenging her friends to top her awesome karaoke skills. She calls Bloomington, Minnesota home.

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